We Should Trade a Wall For a Dream Act

Charlie Accetta
4 min readDec 16, 2018
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Many of us on the Progressive side of the aisle feel border security was always a question of conditions throughout the world. If things were hunky-dory in Italy after the First World War, Grandpa Elmo may never have felt the urge to emigrate with his family. If the potato crop hadn’t succumbed to The Blight, my red-headed cousins-in-law would still be drinking Dublin dry. The migration patterns of humanity never took a knee at the foot of any wall. One doesn’t need to be Batman or Robin Hood to accomplish the breech. History tells us physical walls are both a waste of resources and a poorly-stated message to the rest of the world. Obviously, I hate the very idea of a man-made barrier running through the border region. It would interfere with wildlife migration. In places, it would impose itself onto private property (although I don’t understand why every square inch of border property isn’t already under Federal control). And let’s not forget our 6th grade geography, when it was pointed out that the Rio Grande meanders in places, making its role in border demarcation a bit inexact. It’s a bad idea all around. It’s not quite as childish an idea as Brexit, but it certainly needs a permanent timeout.

And yet, I would make a personal monetary contribution toward the design and construction of the Southern Border Wall in exchange for a final decision in favor of the children of undocumented aliens who were not born here. The DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) program was initiated through an Executive Order by President Barack Obama. It has already been ruled unconstitutional in a lower court. The policy allows for biannual renewals for residence and work papers and protects around 700,000 American residents from deportation. Those people are technically aliens, but it was not their decision to leave their homeland. In fact, most do not consider the country of their birth to be their homeland. They are as American as we are. They may be bilingual, but so are a lot of native-born Americans. They have jobs. They provide services to their communities, just as most of us do. Are there bad people among them? Sure, just as there are bad people in your own family. Those red-headed cousins-in-law, for instance.

This is a moral issue. Anti-immigrant activists point to the rule of law (which sounds hilarious coming from the mouths of…

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Charlie Accetta

What can I say? I do this thing. Otherwise, I'm a regular guy. I drive fast, when traffic allows. I use Just For Men liberally. And you're no better.